Fungi

Contact FunGuy@MycoMitch.com for pricing and availability of gourmet mushrooms.  Pricing is based off Supply & Demand, and current market value.  Mushrooms can be bought per lb, wet or dry.

Pleurotus eryngii also known as king trumpet mushroom, French horn mushroom, king oyster mushroom, king brown mushroom. Pleurotus eryngii is by far the best tasting Oyster mushroom, well deserving of the title, the King Oyster. Popular in Europe, this stout, thickly fleshed mushroom, is one of the largest species in the genus. Preferring hardwoods, this mushroom is easy to grow. Although this mushroom grows on cereal (wheat) straws, the yields are not as substantial as that of Pleurotus ostreatus and Pleurotus pulmonarius on this same material, at the same rate of spawning, unless supplements are added or a unique spawning method is employed. Substrates for Fruiting: Most hardwoods, wheat straw, and cottonseed hulls or wheat bran support fruitings. Microscopic Features: This mushroom produces white spores.

Pleurotus citrinopileatus, the golden oyster mushroom. Few mushrooms are as spectacular as this one. Its brilliant yellow color astonishes all who first see it. This species forms clusters hosting a high number of individual mushrooms, whose stems often diverge from a single base. Its extreme fragility post harvest limits its distribution to far away markets. Spicy and bitter at first, this mushroom imparts a strong nutty flavor upon thorough cooking. Pleurotus citrinopileatus grows quickly though pasteurized straw and sterilized sawdust, and thrives at high temperatures. Substrate for Fruiting: Pasteurized wheat, cottonseed hulls, chopped corn cobs, sawdusts. Mycelial Characteristics: Cottony, whitish mycelium, often with tufts of dense growth, sometimes with yellowish tones, and occasionally run through with underlying rhizomorphic strands. Microscopic Features: This mushroom produces pale pinkish buff colored spores.

Pleurotus djamorcommonly known as the pink oyster mushroom, is a species of fungusin the family Pleurotaceae. This species encompasses a complex of brilliantly pink Oyster mushrooms. The pink Oyster varieties are the most common occurring wild Pleurotus in pan-tropical climatic zones of the world. Known for its speed to fruiting, ability to flourish on a wide variety of base materials, and high temperature tolerance, this species is so aggressive as to colonize unpasteurized bulk substrates before competitors can flourish. Substrates for Fruiting: Hardwood sawdust, cereal straw, corn waste, coffee residue, cotton waste, banana fronds, palm debris, and sugar cane bagasse. Microscopic Features: From the same fruiting pink spores are collected from pink mushrooms, and light beige spores from mushrooms that were originally pink but faded to cream beige.

Pleurotus ostreatus, the oyster mushroom, is a common edible mushroom. The prototypic Oyster mushroom, Pleurotus ostreatus has long been a favorite of mushroom hunters, especially in the spring time in lowland, hardwood forests. A prolific producer on a wide array of substrates, strains of this species are plentiful and easy to grow. Mycelial Characteristics: Whitish, longitudinally radical, soon becoming cottony, and in age forming a thick, tenacious mycelial mat. Aged mycelium often secretes yellowish to orangish droplets of a metabolite which is a toxin to nematodes. This metabolite deserves greater study. Spawn Media: Rye, wheat, milo, sorghum, corn, and millet. Sawdust spawn in not needed for indoor cultivation methods. However, sawdust spawn is ideal in the inoculation of stumps and logs in outdoor settings. Yield Potentials: 75-200% biological efficiency, greatly affected by teh size of teh fruitbodies harvested, and the number of flushes orchestrated.

Pleurotus ostreatus, the oyster mushroom, is a common edible mushroom. Prototypic Oyster mushroom, Pleurotus ostreatus has long been a favorite of mushroom hunters, especially in the spring time in lowland, hardwood forests. A prolific producer on a wide array of substrates, strains of this species are plentiful and easy to grow. Enjoying a worldwide reputation, specimens of extraordinary size have been collected from the wild. For instance, in the fall of 1998 near the north coast of Sicily, Salvatore Terracina, a farmer, collected a P. ostreatus nearly 8 ft. in circumference, 20 inches thick, and weighin 42lbs!  Substrates for Fruiting: straw ; corn stalks, sugar cane bagasse; coffee pulp; banana waste; cotton waste and cottonseed hulls; hardwood sawdusts; pater by-products; soybean waste; palm oil by-products. Microscopic Features: This mushroom produces white, to slightly lilac, to lilac grey spores.

Information Provided By Shroomery.org